SHIRT pays homage to NYC with a video for “Cuba”

t-shirt-rapper

“You not iller cause you got bread. You could be wearing three vests I’d still come for your head.”

SHIRT is unapologetically New York, but in the best way. I’ve been failing to categorize his sound and style since I stumbled upon his RAP EP a few years back. Currently I think he falls somewhere between Jay Z, Kanye and Ghostface Killah. Even that doesn’t do the man justice, he’s his own rapper, but the more I listen, the more I pick up on little things. For example at the 1:17 mark of “Cuba” he spits out a snarling “ughh” similar to the one that Pusha T is known for, but it’s not menacing, it’s relaxed like Jay Z’s “Uhh” but urgent like Kanye’s “Huuuuh.” Anyway, the man can spit and he’s mad creative. Still upset I didn’t score the latest drop of color tees he made. So SHIRT, if you read this, hook me up man. “Cuba” can be streamed below, an homage to New York amongst other things, the song’s impeccable production comes from United Crates and Bass Estrada. Check it out below and read what SHIRT had to say about the message behind the video.

“Cuba video is a kaleidoscopic assemblage and poetic history of New York: an unparalleled and original homage to the city, composed entirely of quotations. Drawn from a huge array of sources—histories, memoirs, newspaper articles, novels, government documents, emails—and organized into interpretive categories that reveal the philosophical architecture of the city, Cuba is the ne plus ultra of videos on the ultimate megalopolis. 

It is also a video of experimental cinema that transposes Walter Benjamin’s unfinished magnum opus of literary montage on the modern city, The Arcades Project, from 19th-century Paris to 20th-century New York, bringing the streets to life in categories such as “Sex,” “Commodity,” “Downtown,” “Subway,” and Mapplethorpe.

Cuba is a video designed to fascinate and to fail—for can a megalopolis truly be written? Can a history, no matter how extensive, ever be comprehensive? Each reading of this book, and of New York, is a unique and impossible passage.”

Written by Jesse Wiles

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